ARC Review: Serious Moonlight by Jenn Bennett

book review

I have some serious love (and some criticisms) for this book.

Serious Moonlight by Jenn Bennett follows Birdie, an eighteen-year-old girl with narcolepsy and love for mysteries after she takes a night shift job at a hotel. On the job,Serious Moonlight Birdie runs into Daniel Aoki, a brief fling who she works with to solve the mystery of a reclusive writer who visits the hotel.

I have read one other book by Jenn Bennett, Alex, Approximately, which was an average read for me. I read Alex, Approximately as an ARC. While I enjoyed it, I was surprised to see so much hype surrounding the book upon its release. I wanted to try another book by this author to see if it lived up to the hype since I am a huge fan of contemporary books. While Serious Moonlight started off much stronger for me that Alex, Approximately, it ended up falling into several of the pitfalls that I did not enjoy in the first book that I read by this author.

Let’s start with the characters. Jenn Bennett does an amazing job of inclusivity with her characters. She includes characters from different races and cultures. Her characters struggle with mental illness or disability. But Jenn Bennet does not just include diversity in her books, but she fully fleshes out every character so they come across as people and not a checklist. The main character, Birdie is a shy and sweet main character that I think many readers will enjoy. Daniel, Birdie’s love interest, is also multi-faceted and interested. While I was initially put off by the “he’s perfect, but WAIT there’s a MASSIVE secret,” I think the author really steered clear of the typical formula that trope follows.

That being said, there were a few issues that I had with characterization in her book. My largest issue was with Birdie’s Aunt Mona and her former flame, Leon Snodgrass (yes, you read that correctly). Aunt Mona has a large personality and outfits to match. So much that you may roll your eyes at her outfit descriptions because they are so numerous and lengthy. While Aunt Mona has many moments that let readers see how amazing she is, I could do without the countless descriptions of her outfits that attempt to make her look quirky. The same goes for her love interest Leon Snodgrass, presented as what a frat boy becomes when he leaves college and barely anything else. I had this same problem in Alex, Approximately because I felt like I was being hit over the head with the character’s unique vintage style over and over again.

As for the pacing, the beginning of Serious Moonlight grabbed me a lot more than Alex, Approximately. For the first 200 pages, I found myself moving through the story quickly. While the mystery aspect could come across cheesy, I actually found it somewhat endearing since it helped Birdie come out of her shell. Then, the book took a major shift. There was a large chunk of the middle solely devoted to the relationship and devoid of any progression of the mystery plot, which confused me. This part of the book really slowed down for me and I found myself pushing through for more of the plot to develop. While I assumed I knew how the mystery ended (and I was correct), this derailment wasn’t my favorite aspect of the book.

Another aspect that I move back and forth on is the relationship in this book. For the majority of the book, I absolutely loved Birdie and Daniel. Both Birdie and Daniel grow as people throughout this book and learn to open up to each other throughout their relationship. I was actually really excited during the first 90% of this book because it generally steered away from the soap-opera style drama that I wasn’t a fan of in Alex, Approximately. Then, the big moment of the mystery came and some of my love left quickly. While I understand how Daniel reacted to this moment, it seemed fairly out of character for him, especially how he treated Birdie after it happened. I also was not satisfied with how quickly the characters moved past this moment either.

Overall, Serious Moonlight is a solid young adult novel. I can see why so many people consider Jenn Bennett an auto-buy contemporary author because she creates loveable and multi-dimensional characters in her books. However, there were still several aspects of this book that reminded me of reasons that Alex, Approximately was only a three star read for me. That being said, I am still interested in checking out Starry Eyes, another book by this author currently out on the market. I give Serious Moonlight three out of five stars.

 

I received Serious Moonlight as an eARC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

 

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ARC Review: There’s Something About Sweetie by Sandhya Menon

book review

There’s something sweet(ie) about this book!

There’s Something About Sweetie by Sandhya Menon follows two athletic Indian-There's Something About SweetieAmerican teenagers who develop a romantic relationship despite cultural and societal expectations. Ashish Patel finds himself heartbroken after his first love cheats on him. Despite his reservations, he asks his parents to set him up with an Indian-American girl. Enter Sweetie Nair, a top-notch track star whose mom opposes the match since she believes her daughter weighs too much. As a result, Sweetie becomes determined to prove her mother wrong.

Sandhya Menon’s books have been hit-or-miss for me. While I enjoyed When Dimple Met Rishi, it lacked the spark to make it one of my favorite contemporaries. On the other hand, I did not enjoy From Twinkle, With Love at all due to unlikable characters and an overdramatic plot. Going into There’s Something About Sweetie, I was not sure what to expect. I’m happy to say this book exceeded my expectations and ranks as my favorite among this author’s books.

I loved both Sweetie and Ashish because their personalities greatly differed from the characters in Menon’s other stories. While I enjoyed Dimple’s headstrong personality and Rishi’s gentlemanly attitude, I found Twinkle and Sahil to be watered down versions of those two characters and less likable. Sweetie possesses the same strong beliefs as Dimple, but comes across a lot more reserved and intuitive to others’ feelings. Rishi completely differs from Rishi or Sahil as he is portrayed as more “popular” and “cool.” I dislike when I read books by the same author and all of the main characters and love interests across the stories read the same. I appreciated that Sweetie and Ashish were vastly different than Menon’s other characters to set them apart.

If you have read Menon’s other two books, they follow a fairly similar formula. Each character has their passion, which is mentioned, but never as integral to the story as it may seem. I would say this is only half true for this book. Based on the synopsis, Sweetie’s track and “Sassy Sweetie Project” is mentioned, but there is a large focus on the dates that she goes on with Ashish as well. I would say the book holds true to the synopsis in this case. While the largest focus is placed on the arranged dates for Sweetie and Ashish, there is a large focus on Sweetie and how her weight is viewed through Indian culture as well. I think this will satisfy readers who were put off by the inaccurate synopses for some of Menon’s other books.

There were several other aspects of this book that I really appreciated. In the author’s note at the beginning of the story, Menon mentioned how her weight has fluctuated through the years and she has had vastly different experiences based on her weight at the time. She also mentioned that Sweetie describes herself as “fat” in the book because it is only a negative word because of societal connotations. However, she also acknowledges that some people, especially those bullied using this specific word, may feel uncomfortable when they see this word in the story and they are entitled to that feeling. I always appreciate reading about an author’s connection to a story and I thought Menon’s note before the story was incredibly thoughtful to those who may be triggered by the discrimination that Sweetie faces, especially since it often comes from close family members within this story. Just a warning: While this book does have a prevailing message of loving your body that although authentically portrays Sweetie’s experience, it may be extremely uncomfortable for some readers who struggle with body image. Since there is a large amount of negative commentary regarding Sweetie’s weight, you may want to skip this book if this triggers you.

Another aspect of this book that I really enjoyed was learning more about Indian culture. Sweetie and Ashish go on arranged dates by Ashish’s parents that are described as “typically Indian.” It was interesting to learn more about Indian culture and its influence in Indian-Americans’ lives. I think the two main characters also provided other perspectives that we have not seen yet in Menon’s books. Prior to this story, Ashish only dated white girls. Sweetie does not fit the stereotypical mold of the “perfect” Indian girl. It was interesting to read the conversations surrounding these topics in the story.

Overall, I really enjoyed There’s Something About Sweetie. I really liked the main characters and learning about a culture different than my own. I give this book four out of five stars.

 

I received a copy of this book via NetGalley from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. 

 

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Sadie by Courtney Summers Review

book review

Sadie by Courtney Summers follows Sadie who embarks on a journey to find the murderer of her dead sister, who she raised due to her mother’s lack of involvement. Fascinated by the story, a radio host follows Sadie’s tracks in hopes to find Sadie who has been missing for a long time.

While I am not a huge thriller/mystery fan, I decided to pick up Sadie due to hearing many positive reviews. I was also interested in the format, which combines Sadie’s story as well as a podcast that chronicles her journey. Although I find Sadie an interesting and enjoyable story, it did not live up to the hype for me.

Overall, Sadie is an interesting and complex character. After surviving some traumatic experiences in her childhood and raising her younger sister, Sadie presents herself as tough and serious. However, readers also get to see a more vulnerable side of Sadie through several of her interactions with other people she meets throughout her journey. However, my favorite aspect of Sadie’s character is how realistic and relatable she is as a person. There are so many Sadies out there in the world that I think would resonate with her story.

As for the format of the book, it was a bit hit-or-miss for me. I really liked the concept of following the story through Sadie’s eyes and a podcast, but for me, it did not always enhance my reading experiences. Since the podcast’s hosts follow Sadie’s footsteps, some information is repeated throughout the story. While readers sometimes see the consequences of Sadie’s actions in the book, I felt like some of the podcast did not add anything to the story after you read it from Sadie’s perspective. Working towards the climax of the story, I sometimes wanted to push through the podcast aspect and get back to Sadie’s perspective. While I understand why the podcast was necessary for some aspects of the story, I think it could have been incorporated more successfully into the story.

I also think some readers may find the story predictable and the ending as flat. While I do not read this genre often, I was still able to figure out the mystery fairly early on in the story. While I continued the book due to my investment in Sadie as a character, other readers who frequently read this genre in favor of a less predictable storyline. Additionally, some readers may find the ending of this book as unfulfilling. I understand the author’s purpose behind the ending in the story, however, some readers may feel disappointed by the somewhat open ending.

Overall, Sadie is an interesting and overall enjoyable read. While I found the story somewhat predictable, this story still stuck with me after reading. I could not help but think of all the people with a similar story to Sadie in the world. I would recommend this book to people looking for more of an impactful mystery than a true mystery or thriller. I give this book three out of five stars.

 

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99 Percent Mine Review

book review

I’m 99% sure this book won’t end up on my favorites list this year.

99 Percent Mine by Sally Thorne follows Darcy Barrett, a tough bartender who enjoys photography and traveling the world. After inheriting a cottage from her 99 Percent Minegrandmother, however, she finds herself back in her hometown. When Darcy’s brother insists on renovating the cottage to sell, he recruits his longtime best friend Tom and Darcy’s longtime crush, Tom to complete the project.

I read The Hating Game by Sally Thorne last year after countless recommendations online and ended up really enjoying it. In fact, it motivated me to pick up other new adult and adult books last year that I really enjoyed. As a result, I automatically put 99 Percent Mine on my to-buy list for 2019. Unfortunately for me, I did not enjoy this story nearly as much as The Hating Game. That being said, there are some good aspects of this book that will motivate me to pick up more books from this author in the future.

Let’s start off with the main character, Darcy. If you read The Hating Game, Darcy is the complete opposite of Lucy. Darcy is a no-nonsense girl who can put the rowdiest patrons of a biker bar in their place. Darcy is a girl who knows exactly what, and who, she wants. She never backs down from a challenge or anyone who tries to put her down. While I relate more to Lucy in The Hating Game, I still appreciate Darcy as a character. I think all of her actions in the book aligned well with her motivations. I also enjoy that Sally Thorne created a main character drastically different from her first novel because it shows she can write a wide variety of characters.

On to the romance! This aspect of the book fell flat for me. For some reason, I found it hard to connect with the relationship between Darcy and Tom. While the two had some chemistry, it never really popped off the page like with Lucy and Josh from The Hating Game. For me, the banter was not as entertaining. Additionally, since this book takes place over a shorter time span, you do not see as much of their relationship develop on the page. I also did not enjoy the whole “Tom might be still engaged” plotline that spanned the first half of the book.

Overall, 99 Percent Mine failed to create the same spark that The Hating Game did for me. I think I set my expectations too high going into this book, which may have impacted my reading experience. While 99 Percent Mine is a quick and easy read, it is not particularly memorable or a book that’s on the top of my re-read list. I give this book three out of five stars.

 

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Cold Day in the Sun Review

book review

This book may be called Cold Day in the Sun, but it will warm up your heart.

Cold Day in the Sun by Sara Biren follows Holland “Dutch” Delviss, a female Cold Day in the Sunhockey player whose team may be chosen for a widely televised hockey event. However, her team’s chance rests on her ability play up her status as the only female on the team. While some people in town show their disdain for Holland’s involvement in the team, she finds support from one of the team’s captain, Wes.

I’m a huge hockey fan, so I was instantly excited when I saw this book on NetGalley. I quickly requested it and was thrilled to read it once approved. From this book, I expected a cute romance as well as some conversations surrounding the discrimination women face when they enter a male-dominated sport. While I enjoyed this quick and fun read, there were some aspects that needed some improvement to make this book a stand-out for me.

I think my favorite aspect of this book was the relationship between Holland and Wes. While I do think their banter was sometimes over the top and their relationship changed to quickly from “hate” to “love”, I generally liked them both as characters and saw the chemistry between them. Their relationship also added to the conversation this book brought up about the discrimination women face in male-dominated sports due to some of the barriers they faced in their relationship, which I appreciated.

I also enjoyed the main character, Holland. She is willing to call out anyone who makes a sexist comment towards her or other people. While she sometimes doubts herself and her abilities, this makes her extremely relatable to other young female readers who face the same discrimination as Holland.

That being said, there were a few other aspects of the novel that fell flat for me, namely the big game constantly emphasized throughout the novel. The actual game comprises very little of the book and the ending left me very unsatisfied. The hockey games often took a large back seat to the romance, journalism, or music aspects of the novel. While I appreciated seeing some of Holland’s other interests, I think it caused some of the other aspects of the story that I was really excited about not be well developed. The game had a lot of build-up, but not a lot of reward.

I also have mixed feelings towards how the feminist aspects played out in this novel. I appreciated how even though Holland played on the boy’s team instead of the girl’s team, she didn’t put down the talent and drive of the girl’s teams. However, I wished more aspects of this part of the story were fleshed out. There were people who made comments on the ice or members of the town that I wished were wrapped up in a more satisfying way. I appreciated that whenever a sexist comment was made, it was immediately shut down. Still, I wanted some big moment at the end to wrap up all the commentary provided in this novel, but I felt like I never got that.

Overall, Cold Day in the Sun is a great sports romance read that is perfect for fans of Miranda Kenneally’s Hundred Oak series. I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys hockey or young adult books that heavily focus on the romance. I give this book three out of four stars.

 

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February Reading-Wrap Up

monthly wrap up.png

This month, my reading was pretty average. Out of the five books I read, I rated four of the books as three-star reads. However, I did have one five-star read. Overall, I did enjoy all the books that I read this month, even though several weren’t exactly memorable. Here’s what I read and my thoughts on them:

  • Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman (★ ★ ★ ★ ★)

Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine

This book actually started out fairly slow for me. I hear a lot of hype going into this book and midway through I had a feeling this would only be an average read for me. However, the ending completely changed my mind. The ending of this book was extremely emotional, raw, and real. The end definitely redeemed the book for me and it ended up being a five-star read for me.

  • The Kiss Quotient by Helen Hoang (★ ★ ★)

The Kiss Quotient

The Kiss Quotient is a quick, fun read. However, it lacked the emotional depth for me to invest in the characters and their relationship. While this was an enjoyable read, it definitely wasn’t the most memorable for me.

  • 99 Percent Mine by Sally Thorne (★ ★ ★)

99 Percent Mine

I was so excited for 99 Percent Mine since I loved The Hating Game. I was slightly disappointed with this book because I did not love it as nearly as much as The Hating Game. Like with The Kiss Quotient, I never connected with the characters and as a result, their relationship fell flat for me. While a fun and quick read, it did not live up to my expectations.

  • Fame, Fate, and the First Kiss by Kasie West (★ ★ ★)

Fame, Fate, and the First Kiss

Kasie West is an auto-buy contemporary author for me and I was excited to read about Lacey, who appeared in my favorite book by this author, Love, Life, and the List. However, I’m not a big fan of books involving celebrity and movie sets. Sadly, this book was no exception. Sometimes, Kasie West’s books can be a little all over the place in terms of plot. Unfortunately, this book followed that format. While cute, the relationship also isn’t my favorite out of her books.

  • Sadie by Courtney Summers (★ ★ ★)

Sadie

I’m not a big mystery/thriller type of person, but I heard nothing but positive reviews about this book. I think the hype of this book took away from some of my enjoyment. I understand the message this book wanted to convey, but I found the ending unsatisfying. Plus, sometimes the podcast aspect which was really relevant and unique, bored me because it was like playing catch up on already known information.

 

What was the best book that you read in February?

 

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Top Ten Tuesday: Places in Books that I Would Love to Visit

top ten

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. This week’s theme is places in books that you would love to visit. Here are my choices:

  • Colby Beach from multiple Sarah Dessen novels

Along for the Ride

Sarah Dessen is one of my favorite young adult authors and Colby Beach is a staple location in many of her books. I would love to shop at Clementine’s, pick up some snacks, or eat the legendary onion rings and pie.

  • Meade Creamery from Stay Sweet by Siobhan Vivian

Stay Sweet

Meade Creamery not only has amazing ice cream, but boasts a long history of a female-run business. I would love to show my support for Meade’s Creamy by purchasing some delicious ice cream!

  • Velaris from A Court of Mist and Fury by Sarah J. Maas

A Court of Mist and Fury (A Court of Thorns and Roses, #2)

Who wouldn’t want to visit the City of Starlight? I would love to visit this city to see some of my favorite characters.

  • The Rampion from Cress by Marissa Meyer

Cress (The Lunar Chronicles, #3)

Thorne is one of my favorite characters from The Lunar Chronicles, so I would love to chance to travel on his ship.

  • Court of Faerie from The Cruel Prince by Holly Black

The Cruel Prince (The Folk of the Air, #1)

I would not want to necessarily visit the Court of Faerie. However, I would love to be a fly on the wall to learn all the secrets about the people inside.

  • France from Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins

Anna and the French Kiss (Anna and the French Kiss, #1)

After reading this book, I wanted nothing more than to go to a boarding school in France. Perkins included a lot of descriptions about places and food that I couldn’t help but wish to travel there!

  • Ireland from Love & Luck by Jenna Evans Welch

Love & Luck

Jenna Evans Welch does an amazing job describing scenery and this book was no exception. I felt like I was in Ireland while reading this book. However, I’ve never actually been to Ireland, so this book makes me want to travel there and experience it for myself.

  • Greece from Sophomore Year is Greek to Me by Meredith Zeitlin

Sophomore Year Is Greek to Me

I loved how much this book focused on the setting, culture, and family. Like with Love & Luck, I felt like I was actually there! Now, I need to actually travel there and experience it for myself.

  • Italy from Love & Gelato by Jenna Evans Welch

Love & Gelato

Like with Love & Luck, Jenna Evans Welch did an amazing job describing the location and culture of Italy in this book. Her books always make me want to travel somewhere new!

  • Genovia from The Princess Diaries by Meg Cabot

The Princess Diaries (The Princess Diaries, #1)

I absolutely loved The Princess Diaries when I was younger. I always wanted to visit Genovia!

 

What are some places in books that you would love to visit?

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The Sunshine Blogger Award

Book Tag

Thanks for nominating me Books, Life, and Other Oddities!

The Rules:

  1. Thank the blogger who nominated you in a blog post and link back to their blog.
  2. Answer the 11 questions the blogger asked you.
  3. Nominate 11 new blogs to receive the award and write them 11 new questions.
  4. List the rules.

The Questions:

  • What is your current read?

Right now, I am reading Sadie by Courtney Summers. I’m not typically interested in mysteries/thrillers, but I have heard nothing but good reviews about this book, so I decided to pick it up! I’m not very far in, but I think the podcast concept is interesting and very relevant.

  • How many books have you read this year so far?

I have read seven books so far: Snow in Love by various YA authors, Famous in a Small Town by Emma Mills, The Wicked King by Holly Black, Eleanor Oliphant in Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman, The Kiss Quotient by Helen Hoang, 99 Percent Mine by Sally Thorne, and Fame, Fate, and the First Kiss by Kasie West.

  • What’s your favorite read of 2018?

It’s so hard to pick just one! The top five books in my annual Brittany Awards were Love, Life, and the List by Kasie West, The Names They Gave Us by Emery Lord, Save the Date by Morgan Matson, Stay Sweet by Siobhan Vivian, and How to Say I Love You Out Loud by Karole Cozzo.

  • What’s your most anticipated read of 2019?

My most anticipated read of 2019 if The Rest of the Story by Sarah Dessen. Her books were a staple during my middle school/high school years and she’s the author of my favorite young adult novel, Just Listen. This book sounds like classic Sarah Dessen compared to her more recent releases, so I’m very excited to pick this one up!

  • Do you read with music or read silently?

I cannot read with music! It’s too difficult for me to follow along and concentrate on the book I’m reading.

  • Long books or short books?

I like books in the middle! A lot of times, I’ve found that long books have a lot of unnecessary parts. Meanwhile, books that are short often leave me feeling unsatisfied. However, there are always exceptions!

  • What’s your favorite spot to read?

I like to read on the couch or in my bed!

  • What’s your favorite type of cake?

Everyone makes fun of me for this, but I really, really love carrot cake! However, I mostly get cookie cakes for my birthday (does that really count as cake?) because I have a twin sister. Since we share a birthday, we share a cake and cookie cake is something we can both agree on.

  • Do you pronounce scones as ‘skuns’ or ‘scowns’?

It rhymes with tone the way that I say it!

  • Favourite mythical creature?

My favorite mythical creature is a unicorn! This is widely known by friends and family who always put my presents in unicorn bags, get me unicorn presents, or make group chats that make me the unicorn emoji in the title.

  • What would be your dream job?

Currently, I am working in my dream job! I’ve wanted to be a teacher since I was in elementary school. Now, I am an elementary special education teacher.

My Questions:

  • What is your favorite genre to read?
  • What is your favorite television show or Netflix show?
  • What was your most recent five star read?
  • What was the most recent movie you watched?
  • What genre do you hope to read more from in 2019?
  • What kind of music do you like?
  • How many books do you want to read in 2019?
  • Where is one place you would like to visit?
  • What is your favorite type of blog post to write?
  • What is your favorite animal?
  • What was your favorite subject in school?

I tag…

 

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Book Review: The Wicked King by Holly Black

book review

Second book slump? The Wicked King’s never heard of her. 💁

The Wicked King by Holly Black picks up after the events of The Cruel PriThe Wicked King (The Folk of the Air, #2)nce, the first book in The Folk of the Air series. Jude and Cardan navigate the politics of the faerie world, but Jude worries that someone may betray her. Jude investigates to discover the person before it is too late.

I read The Cruel Prince after it was released last year (see my review here). After finishing A Court of Thorns and Roses, I was eager to read more fantasy books set in a faerie world. While I was impressed with Holly Black’s writing style, I was disappointed that the book did not feature as much politics as I expected. Additionally, the characters, which is a major hook for me into a story, did not manage to stand out amongst other YA fantasy books. However, the cliff hanger ending convinced me to carry on with the series.

I am glad that I continued on with this series because, in my opinion, The Wicked King was much more enjoyable and interesting than The Cruel Prince. While I do stand by some of my claims (which I will get into later) from the first book, I found the areas that were lacking in the first book for me were much improved in the second installment. Overall, this was one of my favorite books of the year thus far and I am eagerly anticipating the third book in this series. Now, onto the review!

As for the main characters, Jude and Cardan, I found them much more complex and fun to read about than in the first book. With Jude, I found there was a lot more telling than showing with her intellect regarding politics in the first book. However, this was the complete opposite in The Wicked King. As for Cardan, I found that we saw a lot of his awful actions in the first book, but did not see as much of his true manipulation abilities. Since Jude is closer to Cardan in this book, readers see that Cardan’s cruelty extends far more than his actions, which leads to an incredible cliff hanger at the end of the story.

Regarding the “relationship” between Jude and Cardan, it’s a little complicated. For me, Jude and Cardan are by no means “couple goals” due to the way they manipulate each other which one of my biggest gripes with The Cruel Prince because I felt like that wasn’t clear. However, I think this book makes it more clear that Jude and Cardan are very manipulative people who are not going to change by simply being in a relationship as their personalities are much more developed in this book than The Cruel Prince. While Jude and Cardan are not an OTP for me, how they act in this “relationship” is true to character. That being said, if you do not like seeing unhealthy relationships in this book, it may be one to skip.

Looking at the pacing and writing style, I could not put this book down. Holly Black has a writing style that is clear and concise with her word choice. So many times, I found myself using the dictionary feature of my Kindle because I loved the word choices she used. Her pacing was also spot-on. There were so many twist and turns, sub-plots, and surprises that kept me turning the pages. You see so much for of the faerie world and customs in this story, but it is woven so well together that nothing feels like an info dump. Plus, THAT CLIFFHANGER! How can I wait one more year to find out what happens next?

Overall, I really enjoyed my reading experience with The Wicked King. The characterization, world-building, and pacing were all that I was looking for when I picked this book up. I give The Wicked King five out of five stars.

 

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Books I Read in 2018

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Whew! After reading a ton of books during Christmas time, I finished reading almost 70 books this year. I set my goal at 50 books, which I wasn’t sure I would complete due to my hectic schedule. However, I completed my goal I believe sometime in the fall and managed to squeeze in some more books as well. Here’s to some more great reading in the new year!

Below I’ve listed all the books that I read in 2018, in the order in which I read them. Any book with a review currently posted will have a link on the book’s title. Titles marked with a * appeared on one of my favorite lists (The Brittany Awards) in 2018 or, if it is a re-read, appeared in a favorites list of a previous year. Any title marked with a ^ means it was featured as one of my least favorite books of the year.