Crazy Stupid Bromance Review

Crazy Stupid Bromance in the third book in The Bromance a Book Club series by Lyssa Kay Adams. This book follows Alexis, a cafe owner who recently came forward as a victim of sexual harassment of a famous chef. When a girl shows up in her cafe and claims they are sisters, Alexis is shocked and hurt. However, her best friend Noah Logan is always by her side… even if he won’t express her true feelings for her.

My biggest gripe with the second book in this series, Undercover Bromance, was that it tackled big issues in an ineffective way. Additionally, it lacked many of the characteristics that readers enjoyed within the first installment of this series. Unfortunately, Crazy Stupid Bromance also fell into many of these pitfalls. However, I did enjoy the third installment in this series slightly more than the second.

Crazy Stupid Bromance (Bromance Book Club, #3)

For me, this book started strong. I liked Alexis and Noah as main characters. The author gave each character a complex background that affected how they lived and interacted with each other. I don’t typically read friends to lovers books, but I think the author did a good transition in this book from the characters being friends to something more. However, as I continued reading, I grew less interested with the book as it seemed many plot points and conversations circled throughout the book.

One aspect of Undercover Bromance that I didn’t like, which also annoyed me in this book, was how the author tackled complex issues. Similar to Undercover Bromance, the climax and resolution of this book involves some serious situations that would greatly affect the world beyond the characters. However, I feel like this big situation is quickly glossed over and resolved with the characters making up after only one conversation. Within this book particularly, I think the author tried to target so many topics that they weren’t woven seamlessly throughout the book.

Another aspect of this book which will disappoint some readers is the limited elements of the original premise of this series. Like with Undercover Bromance, this book ties very loosely to the book club element. Out of all the main male characters, Noah doesn’t seem to really buy into the book club. As a result, the book within a book element is almost non-existent. If you enjoyed this in the first book, were disappointed by how it was included in the second book, then you most likely won’t enjoy how it is included in this book.

Another problem that I have with books in a series is when the characters from the previous books become caricatures of themselves and only adopt one personality trait. This is extremely true for Crazy Stupid Bromance concerning Liv and Mack. I already thought Mack lost a lot of his interesting qualities in Undercover Bromance, but I found this to be even more true in this installment. This proves true for other characters as well, for example Colt and Vlad, who for some reason, they can never refer to by his actual name and instead just call him “The Russian (Does that bother anyone else as much as it bothers me?). This seems to be true for many of the books in the series: the side characters are treated more as a “gag” than an important part of the story. Since the club and friends are supposed to be a big part of these stories, it is a little frustrating to see them just as props.

Overall, Crazy Stupid Bromance isn’t my favorite book in this series, but it isn’t my least favorite either. Unfortunately, I am starting to see patterns in this author’s work that aren’t really my cup of tea. While I may give the next book in this series a shot, it will not be high on my TBR list. I give this book 2.5 out of five stars.

Undercover Bromance Book Review

It’s no secret that this was not my favorite book in this series.

Undercover Bromance by Lyssa Kay Adams is the second book in The Bromance a Book Club companion series. This installment follows Liv, Thea’s independent sister, who uncovers that her boss is making unwanted sexual advances towards her co-workers. After she is fired, one of the member of The Bromance Book Club, offers her a new job and support to bring the actions of her former boss to light.

When I first saw that this book included Liv as the main character, I was hesitant. I wasn’t a huge fan of Liv in the original book in the series because she seemed unwilling to give people second chances and overstepped her boundaries in her sister’s relationship, in my opinion. Unfortunately, I found many of these aspects present in this installment of the series. While some of Liv’s inappropriate behavior is addressed, it still put a damper on the book of me as a whole.

Undercover Bromance (Bromance Book Club, #2)

From the first book, readers know that Liv is a strong and independent woman who will share her opinions without any reservations. In some moments this can be a good thing, like when she tells off her former boss who sexually assaults women. On the other hand, Liv often does not change her tone when speaking to victims of her old boss. Often, her words come across as victim shaming, as many of the victims of the high profile chef are too scared to come forward with the allegations. Despite the victims’ fears, Liv continues to push them. While one of the victims calls out Liv for insensitive comments she makes throughout the book, and Liv does apologize, it seems that Liv’s actions are almost brushed over too quickly with the rushed ending of the book.

One aspect of this book that I did not enjoy as much as the previous book was the relationship. Gavin and Thea both matured so much throughout the book. They both had distinct personalities with a deep history. I did not see that as much with Liv and Mack, the couple within this book. In this book, and the subsequent book in this series, Mack changes from the cool and interesting Bromance book club member to a caricature of himself. They both have past experiences which impact how they view relationships, but it wasn’t woven as seamlessly in this book. I also did not like how Mack’s “secret” was used as leverage against him (not by Liv). Although it is pointed out that this is wrong, it seems that this book consistently has characters pushing other characters to reveal past trauma in a very public setting which doesn’t sit right with me.

Another aspect of this book that I think some readers will not enjoy is that the book club doesn’t make as large of an appearance within this installment. The book that they are reading is barely referenced. If you enjoyed the structure of the first book and how it included the book within a book element, you may be disappointed that it is lacking within this installment. As I mentioned in my review of the first book, I am not really a fan of this element in books, so it didn’t bother me, but the lack of consistency within the series regarding this element may bother other readers.

I appreciate that this romance book tried to tackle large current topics. However, I do not think this book addressed these topics in a successful way. While there were some moments of this book that I enjoyed, they were few and far between. I give this book two out of five stars.

The Bromance Book Club Review

This book almost hit it out of the park.

The Bromance Book Club by Alyssa Kay Adams follows professional baseball player Gavin Scott after he and is his wife, Thea, separate due to issues in their relationship. In order to save his marriage, Gavin’s friends invite him to join their a book club where they read romance novels to learn how to improve their own relationships.

I remember when this book came out, it landed many four and five star reviews. It was definitely a hyped book online upon its release, which made me curious to read it. Like with many hyped books, I didn’t find myself fully in agreement with the hype, even though this was an overall solid book.

The Bromance Book Club (Bromance Book Club, #1)

One aspect of this book that I enjoyed was the character development for the two main characters, Gavin and Thea. We learn a lot about the history of their relationship, as well as their experiences before their relationship, which greatly impact their current status. Both characters confront issues in their marriage and change for the better, which makes it easy for readers to believe that the characters will last off of the page.

I have read all of the books in this series released so far, and by far, this one includes the book club element most effectively. I found some of the members of the book club to be a little cartoonish and while I am not a huge fan of reading parts of a book within a book, I think many readers appreciate how Gavin and Thea’s story relates to the book club element.

While there were several aspects of this book that I enjoyed, it was missing an extra spark for me to keep me fully invested. I found myself picking up this book and putting it down after finishing one chapter. This book has a solid idea and solid main characters, but at some points, the plot dragged for me a little bit.

Overall, The Bromance Book Club is a solid romance, and for me, the strongest in the series. That being said, this book just didn’t grab me, although I can see why other readers would rate it higher. Since this book was only average for me, I give it three out of five stars.

Fix Her Up Book Review

This book just needed a few renovations to be perfect.

Fix Her Up by Tessa Bailey follows Georgette “Georgie” Castle who fake dates former baseball player and childhood crush Travis Ford so people will think she is more mature and to help him score a commentating job. While the two agree to keep the fake relationship casual, the situation becomes more confusing when the two start to develop feelings for each other.

Fix Her Up (Hot & Hammered, #1)

For me, Georgie was a very relatable character. Even though Georgie is grown up and has her own job, people in her family don’t take her seriously and can’t see her as anything but a little girl. Georgie is generally a likable character, although some readers may find her over bubbly personality a little bit annoying at times. The other lead, Travis, is similar to Georgie. I didn’t mind him (except when he kept calling Georgie pet names), but there isn’t anything that makes him necessarily stand out from other romantic leads for me. I wish the author would have dived a little bit more into his backstory.

As for the story, the beginning was strong for me, but the end needed a little “fixing up.” I have noticed a pattern within books by Tessa Bailey which sometimes irritates me, but after reading several of her books, I have come to expect it. Once the characters admit their feelings for each other, it seems like there is only is a large emphasis on the physical aspect of the relationship and the characters start to become more one dimensional. The “all is lost” moment is the story is usually isn’t as large or dramatic as I would expect and then the recovery from the all is lost moment always feels rushed to me.

That being said, Fix Her Up is a fun and quick read. Overall, I enjoyed reading this book even though it ends up with an average overall rating for me. I give this book 3.5 stars out of five stars.

ARC Review: Tools of Engagement by Tessa Bailey

Bethany Castle gets a new lease on love.

Tools of Engagement by Tessa Bailey follows Bethany Castle, who wants move away from her staging role in her family’s real estate business by flipping her own house. However, Bethany’s brother has little faith in Bethany’s construction ability. When a reality television show gets wind of their argument, the two participate in a house flipping competition. Unfortunately for Bethany, there’s only one person on her side: Wes Daniels, an annoying (but cute) member of her brother’s crew.

Tools of Engagement (Hot & Hammered, #3)

I didn’t know much of what to expect when I read Tools of Engagement. I know Tessa Bailey is a popular romance author, but I hadn’t read any of her books previously. Although I wasn’t completely sold on all aspects of this book, there were some elements that I really enjoyed.

One of my favorite parts of this book was the main character, Bethany. In many other similar books, Bethany would play the villain as she is pretty and put together all the time. However, I appreciated that Tessa Bailey put her in the focus of this story because readers can see her character more in depth. Bethany struggles with anxiety and the need to be perfect, no matter what. Throughout the novel, Bethany grows significantly by showing more confidence in herself and expressing how she feels to her family and friends who put high expectations on her. I think many readers will relate to Bethany and appreciate her character growth throughout the plot in the book.

As for Bethany’s love interest, Wes, I have mixed feelings. For me, there were aspects about his character that I liked and other that I did not like. Let’s start with what I enjoyed. One of the conflicts in the relationship between Bethany and Wes is the age difference between the two characters (Bethany is 7 years older than Wes who is 23). I appreciate that this book featured a couple with an appropriate age difference as this isn’t typically shown in books. I also appreciated reading about his relationship with his niece, who he takes care of so her mom can get the helps she needs. I thought their relationship was cute and the level of the responsibility that Wes took in this book did make him see more mature.

At the same time, there were some aspects of his character that I just didn’t prefer. Wes can be very possessive with Bethany regarding other males that literally never have even met her. For example, Wes goes to find a crew to work on Bethany’s home remodel. He refuses to get any young men on the crew because he doesn’t want them to flirt with Bethany and instead opts for much older men who struggle to work longer hours on the job site. This isn’t appropriate behavior, whether he is in a relationship with Bethany or not (which he wasn’t when this part of the story occurred). All I know is if I was a 30-year-old woman and a 23-year-old man was acting that way towards me, it wouldn’t be attractive. Also, if I heard about his cowboy hat or read about him calling Bethany “darlin'” one more time, I wouldn’t be able to take it.

As for the construction aspect of the plot, it isn’t too heavily involved in that area. While we have some of the demo and see some of the ending, this aspect of the story was slightly disappointing. Yes, this is a romance, so I did expect that to occupy most of the space, so on that front, it was successful. At the same time, a big chunk of the story is Bethany being more independent, specifically through flipping her own house, so I wish I could have seen a little more of that. I think the most unsatisfying part of this whole novel for me was the ending of the competition because it was very rushed and executed in an unsatisfying way, which is all I can really say without giving any major spoilers.

Also, as a disclaimer this is the third book in the companion series. I haven’t read the first two books in this series, although I’m familiar with their storylines. That being said, not reading the first two books didn’t really hinder my reading experience. I thought the Just Us League, which was probably formed in an earlier book, as well as the background of the family business were described enough that I didn’t feel like I was missing anything from the story.

Overall, Tools of Engagement is a fun romance that was a quick and easy to read. I recommend this book to fans of this companion series as well as any one who enjoys an “enemies” to lover romance. I give this book 3.5 out of 5 stars.

Summer Lovin’ Book Tag

Since summer vacation is about halfway over, I thought it would be the perfect time to complete the Summer Lovin’ Book Tag. I am not sure who started this tag, but if you know, please tell me in the comments so I can give them credit. Here are my answers:

  • Start of Summer: Pick a book with an attention-grabbing first line
Beach Read

This book didn’t have a memorable first line, however, I do think the first chapter did a great job of introducing the main character and pulling me in with a strong voice. While I wasn’t a huge fan of the rest of the novel, I did think the first chapter was strong.

Beach Read follows January, a romance writer, who spends the summer at her recently deceased father’s beach home in Michigan where she encounters August, a literary fiction writer and former college rival. After they run into each other, January and August hold a competition to see how can write better in the other’s genre.

  • Too Hot to Go Out: Pick a book for a day in
Aurora Rising (The Aurora Cycle, #1)

Aurora Rising is a long book, so it is the perfect book to spend the day inside reading. I really enjoyed Aurora Rising for the fun cast of characters and Guardians of the Galaxy-esque style story, however, I was less impressed with the sequel, Aurora Burning, released earlier this year.

Aurora Rising follows Aurora, who wakes up 200 years after she was cryogenically frozen on her way to a space colony. In the future, Aurora learns that the government is keeping the colony a secret for unknown reasons.

  • Summer Road Trip: Pick a book you’d take on the road
Starry Eyes

Starry Eyes doesn’t feature a road trip, but it does feature a hiking trip with some breathtaking descriptions of the scenery. While I’m not the biggest fan of aspects in Jenn Bennett’s earlier works, I always appreciate her attention to detail in the setting.

In Starry Eyes, Zorie and Lennon, once best friends and now enemies, go on a camping trip with friends. When abandoned by their friends, Zorie and Lennon decide to hike in the California forests to reach a stargazing event.

  • Ice Tea Goodness: Pick a book with a cold setting
Tweet Cute

I don’t think it is necessarily cold in this book, but it does take place in New York City, which does get cold and this book did release this past January. That being said, Tweet Cute is a fun contemporary that is perfect to read any time of the year.

Tweet Cute follows Pepper and Jack, the daughter and son of rival business owners, who battle it out on Twitter after the chain restaurant owned by Pepper’s family steals a recipe from the small business of Jack’s family.

  • Nasty Sunburn: A book you really disliked (so far) this year
The Wedding Party (The Wedding Date, #3)

I had high hopes for The Wedding Party because I read The Proposal the year before and really enjoyed it for being a realistic romance. Unfortunately for me, I was disappointed by the inconsistent characters, underdeveloped romance, and all-over-the-place plot in this one.

The Wedding Party follows Maddie and Theo after they are chosen to be in a mutual friend’s wedding party. Although Maddie and Theo claim to dislike each other, they start a secret relationship.

  • Sizzling Summer Reads: Recommend one of your favorite books (this year)
Always Never Yours

I am not someone who typically enjoys books about acting or plays, so I was pleasantly surprised when this became one of my earliest five star reads this year. I especially appreciated the main character in this book, who was extremely outgoing and bold.

Always Never Yours follows Megan Harper, who inadvertently lands the lead role in her school’s production of Romeo and Juliet. However, Megan more identifies with Rosaline, as she always dates guys right before they find their true loves.

What activity do you love to do in the summer?

Recently Received ARCs (June 2020)

Like I mentioned on my last ARC TBR post, I’ve really focused on reading books that catch my attention and that excite me because of my reading slump last year where I found that I was more forcing myself to read certain books than enjoying them. Recently on NetGalley, I found two books that sounded really interesting to me, and fortunately for me, I was approved to receive an eARC. Here are the ARCs that I was recently approved for:

  • Tools of Engagement by Tessa Bailey
Tools of Engagement (Hot & Hammered, #3)

I requested Tools of Engagement because I was looking for more books in the adult age range to read as well as adult books read by new-to-me authors. This book specifically interested me because I read The Honey Don’t List by Christina Lauren earlier this year, another adult romance book involved with home improvement, and enjoyed it. Also, I’ve heard a lot of positive reviews for Tessa Bailey books.

This is the third book in a companion series, but after reading this book, I didn’t find it absolutely necessary to read the other two books first (although the main characters in this book do interact in the previous installments, if that is something that would bother you as a reader). While I had small issues with some aspects of this book, it was exactly what I was looking for in a fun and light-hearted read.

Tools of Engagement follows Bethany Castle who steps aways from her family’s real estate business to flip her own house, much to her brother’s dismay. Their feud catches the eye of a television producer, who wants to turn their situation into a reality competition. Unfortunately for Bethany, the only person on her side is an annoying ex-member of her brother’s renovation crew.

  • In a Holidaze by Christina Lauren
In a Holidaze

Christina Lauren’s books always sound interesting to me, but only come across as average in execution. However, I received an ARC of The Honey Don’t List this year and enjoyed it much more than previous books by this author duo, so I was definitely more interested in reading their next release, In a Holidaze. I am a sucker for books set around Christmas. Although I’m not completely sold on the Groundhog’s Day element of this book, I’m always looking for a book to prove me wrong on a trope that isn’t always my favorite. I haven’t read In a Holidaze yet, but I’m looking forward to reading this book closer to the end of summer.

In a Holidaze follows Maelyn Jones after she spends her final trip to her parents’ cabin in Utah. On the journey home, however, Maelyn gets in a terrible accident where she finds herself reliving her the trip again and again.

What are some books that you are excited for in the second half of 2020?

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*I was sent copies of Tools of Engagement and In a Holidaze as eARCS from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for honest reviews.

July 2020 TBR

I had a great reading month in June, so I’m hoping my reading streak continues into July. Here’s what I plan on reading!

  • Spoiler Alert by Olivia Dade *
Spoiler Alert

I received Spoiler Alert as an eARC via NetGalley. For this book, the artwork on the cover definitely drew me in. Looking at the synopsis, I was a little uneasy heading into this book. Typically, I do not enjoy books set around fandoms, however, I’m always looking for a book that will change my opinion. I actually started this book in June and I’m liking it so far, so I hope my feelings don’t change as I continue to read it.

Spoiler Alert follows Marcus, who stars on a popular television show based on book series. While Marcus acts indifferent in interviews, he actually is a popular fanfic writer of the series online where he disagrees a lot with the show’s takes. Meanwhile, April Whittier also writes fanfic for the show online, and after a picture of her cosplay goes viral, Marcus asks her on a date… neither knowing they talk regularly online and beta read each other’s stories.

  • The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes by Suzanne Collins
The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes (The Hunger Games, #0)

I was so excited for this book. Around the release date, I was rewatching clips from The Hunger Games and watching as everyone received their copies in the mail. While I started this book awhile ago, I just didn’t have the motivation to finish it in June. While I love The Hunger Games, I normally only read books outside of contemporary sporadically, and when I received this book I was already in the middle of Aurora Rising, which is a long book outside of the contemporary genre. Since I’ve read quite a few contemporary books again, I think I will be ready to invest in a dystopian.

The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes follows a young Snow who acts as a mentor in the Hunger Games.

  • In a Holidaze by Christina Lauren *
In a Holidaze

Although I was holding off to read this book until the end of summer, I thought I would give myself a Christmas in July by picking up this book towards the end of the month.

In a Holidaze follows Maelyn, who is distraught over leaving her family’s cabin for the last time ever, after she gets in an accident and must relive that day over and over again.

What books do you plan to read in July?

Any books marked with * were sent to me by the publisher as an eARC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

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June Reading Wrap-Up

I always read more books during the summer time and June has proved to be no exception. This month, I not only tackled some books from my TBR, but also started picking up some more middle grade again which I really enjoyed. Here’s what I read (book reviews will be linked to book titles):

Starry Eyes

Starry Eyes is an earlier Jenn Bennett book, where I tend to have some issues with the characters or plot, but I still overall enjoyed this book. Starry Eyes largely revolves around camping, which made it the perfect book to read in the summertime, especially with Jenn Bennett’s excellent descriptions of the outdoors.

Starry Eyes follows ex-best friends Zorie and Lennon, who are recruited to go on a camping trip with sort-of friends who later ditch them. In order to attend a stargazing party, Zorie must trust Lennon to lead her through the wilderness to their destination.

Aurora Burning (The Aurora Cycle #2)

I loved the first book in this series, Aurora Rising, but I had a lot of issues with this installment that echoed many of the issues other readers had with the first book. My biggest issue with this book was how repetitive much of the plot and dialogue was throughout the book, as well as the pacing, which really dragged in the middle.

Aurora Rising follows Tyler’s squad as they try to save the galaxy. However, their plans are interrupted when Kal’s relatives show up and try to get him back, no matter the cost.

Beach Read

I think I would have enjoyed Beach Read a little more if the marketing accurately reflected the book inside. While I expected Beach Read to be a light-hearted summer romance, it is a lot darker than I expected. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but I think anyone who expects a story similar to what I did will need to take away their expectations to full enjoy this book.

Beach Read follows January Jones, a romance writer, who spends the summer at her recently deceased father’s beach home in order to write her next novel. There, she encounters August, a college rival and literary fiction author, and creates a challenge where they will both write a novel in the other’s preferred genre.

  • Along for the Ride by Sarah Dessen
Along for the Ride

Along for the Ride is one of my favorite Sarah Dessen books and it’s always fun to revisit this book again in the summer. The characters in this book are so well-developed and I have always related to the main character, Auden, which makes the book even more special for me.

Along for the Ride follows Auden, who spends the summer at her father’s house with his new wife and their baby. There, Auden meets Eli, who helps her experience everything she missed out on in her childhood.

  • Tools of Engagement by Tessa Bailey
Tools of Engagement (Hot & Hammered, #3)

Tools of Engagement is another average book that I read in June. I received this book as an eARC from the publisher via NetGalley, so my full review won’t be shared until closer to the release date in September. While there were some things in this book that I really enjoyed, like the main character’s growth, there were other’s that I didn’t enjoy, like some of the love interest’s behavior.

Tools of Engagement follows Bethany who steps aways from her family’s real estate business to flip her own house, much to her brother’s dismay. When their argument attracts a television producer, the siblings are featured on a television show and the only person on Bethany’s side is an ex-member of her brother’s crew.

  • Smile by Raina Telgemeier
Smile

Smile is the first graphic novel that I really remember seeing from my elementary years, although I never read it. I’ve read a few other graphic novel memoirs, and while this isn’t my favorite of the bunch, it was a quick read with a good message.

Smile follows Raina who needs extensive dental work after an accident just as she starts middle school. Raina’s braces greatly affect her self-confidence, but as she gets older, she learns what is really important.

  • Front Desk by Kelly Yang
Front Desk (Front Desk, #1)

I’ve heard a lot about this book, and since I was getting back into middle grade, I thought that I would pick it up. Front Desk is a great middle grade novel that is extremely relevant and doesn’t shy away from tough topics.

Front Desk follows Mia Tang after her family immigrates to the United States from China. Mia’s parents take a job working as hotel managers for a mean boss and Mia works at the front desk in order to help out her parents. Mia’s life grows even more complicated when parents hide immigrants in the unused hotel rooms and her mother discourages her dream of becoming a writer.

  • From the Desk of Zoe Washington by Janae Marks
From the Desk of Zoe Washington

I picked up this book because I after reading Front Desk, I wanted to read more middle grade books. This book appeared as a Kindle Daily Deal recently and the plot sounded interesting, so I couldn’t pass it up. Like Front Desk, this book is extremely relevant and doesn’t shy away from covering tough topics, which I enjoyed.

From the Desk of Zoe Washington follows Zoe, an aspiring baker, who receives a letter from her biological father on her twelfth birthday. Zoe secretly corresponds with her father, who is in prison for murder, and discovers that he may be innocent. As a result, Zoe searches for a way to prove her father’s innocence.

What was the best book that you read in June?

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Summer Book Tag

Summer is now in full swing, so it is the perfect time to complete the summer book tag! I could not find the creator of this tag, but if you know who created it, please leave their blog in the comments so I can credit them. Here are my answers:

  • What book cover makes you think of summer?
Beach Read

How could this book cover not make me think of summer? The title has beach in all capital letters with two people reading books on beach towels. The cover is also bright yellow which makes me think of the sun. While this cover isn’t exactly accurate with what lies in the book, it is definitely reminiscent of the summertime.

  • What book brightened your day?
Starry Eyes

I read through Starry Eyes in one day. If you are looking for a summer book that isn’t beach, then this one will be perfect for you! This book takes place in state parks of California and made me want to go camping this summer.

  • Find a book with yellow on the cover.
The Unhoneymooners

This book takes place in the wintertime, but also in Hawaii, so it still seems very summery to me. It also has a very yellow background with a lot of different flowers on the front which remind me of the summertime.

  • What is your favorite summer beach read?
Along for the Ride

Sarah Dessen’s books have been a summer staple of mine since high school. Colby Beach is mentioned throughout her books, but this is one of the few that primarily takes place there. I feel like this prompt was leaning towards what books do you read at the beach, but for me, it makes me think of books that take place on a beach. Reading this book makes me want to go to the beach, even if most of the book doesn’t take place directly on the water.

  • What action book had you running for the ice cream man?
Aurora Rising (The Aurora Cycle, #1)

Aurora Rising was a slow-moving book for many people, but I was hooked the entire time. I don’t typically read books in this genre, but there were so many twists and turns that I couldn’t stop reading. The authors of this book definitely don’t do things just to please the audience and I was constantly surprised at what happened next.

  • Sunburn! What book has a bad/painful ending?
Aurora Burning (The Aurora Cycle #2)

This book has both a bad and painful ending. The characters in this book are in constant jeopardy and after the first book, you know these authors aren’t going to make it easy for them or the readers which I like. On the other hand, this book lands on a major cliff hanger which really annoyed me. Even though it is part of a series, this book didn’t really have much going on until the very end and it feels like I got cheated as a reader because I still think books in a series should have their own definite end.

  • What book gave you a happy feeling when it ended?
Tools of Engagement (Hot & Hammered, #3)

I think what made me happy about this book was the character growth in the main character, Bethany. She constantly felt pressure to be perfect and meet everyone else’s expectations, but in the end, she started to make choices based on what she wanted. I found myself very similar to Bethany in that regard, so relating to her story put a smile on m6 face.

  • What book cover reminds you of a sunset?
Four Days of You and Me

This book literally has every color of the perfect sunset. It also is about a relationship and how their high school years are winding down which makes me thinking of the sun setting on that chapter of their lives.

  • What book series do you hope to read this summer?
The Betrothed (The Betrothed, #1)

This is the first book in a new series by Kiera Cass. I bought this book when it was released, but haven’t read it yet. I am trying to get caught up on all the Kindle books that I have bought recently, so I hope to knock this one of the list this summer

What books do you hope to read by the end of the summer?

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